Native American Groups

goose.

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Because of the Combine having less of a grip on North America than other parts of the world like Europe, the I think many Native American groups could've stuck together in some way shape or form. I think it'd be cool to make a faction out of this premise. Just a rough idea, but let me know what y'all would think about that. I personally think it'd be pretty cool, having a little Native American settlement or smth somewhere on the map.
 

Mongoose

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Not to necro a thread, this is just my personal take on this very specific question, I've spent probably years making various attempts at Native American focused groups and lore on TRP, transitioning to actually trying to write fiction- this is surprisingly difficult if you are looking to take it seriously and flesh it out.

  1. The indigenous revival of the 90s also coincides with the emergence of the Internet, and a large period where New Age types tokenized Native culture in ways that still affects our popular culture. Depending on the scope of research your group, you're often spending a lot of time not only finding information actually relevant but also having to discard pages and pages of uninformed crap written by Burning Man visitors, /r/historymemes, someone who saw Last of the Mohicans once, and Mormon bushcrafters in Papyrus font to find information that you can use.
  2. Many players I've encountered aren't American and many have never actually met someone who identifies as native, Metis, etc. This then means that when making your group, you are also finding players who will take the premise seriously and not create caricatures of native peoples. This is also to say nothing about innately understanding that people of a certain culture don't always behave the same way like Star Trek characters. From my own perspective, I'm a Japanese person and I can count on one hand the number of people who played Japanese-Americans in a believable way. I could see how frustrating this might get to someone running a group or a RL player of native descent.
  3. There is currently a bit of a visible minority-driven zeitgeist right now in all media, with indigenous stories written by indigenous people. As a result, it feels the quality expectations are much higher for representation in fiction, as there is definitely a visible "colonizer" sense when I watch or read older stuff. I know I've become much more interested in writing what I know as a Japanese person, and leaving alone things which are totally out of my depth.
In the end, there's just a lot of obstacles which makes it kind of an impractical venture for something at the "seriousness" level of GMod. I myself have actually stepped away from most of my indigenous lore until I can have it reviewed by someone who knows more (and not many people will do it outside of the professional sphere on account of people asking these questions all the time), and who knows? I may never pick it up again.

However, inclusion and representation is important in all forms of media including something like Gmod Roleplay. If you (or the community as a whole) are going to have this, it's probably important to educate yourself specifically on modern indigenous issues in North America, the people that live in the region you'd like to set it, how that incorporates into your lore, and if possible have involvement of someone who does know more about it.

Should Non-Native Authors Write about Native Americans? - Novel Factory This article here is a very well rounded take by a FCT Choctaw novelist which I think answers it better than any way I could.
 
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goose.

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Not to necro a thread, this is just my personal take on this very specific question, I've spent probably years making various attempts at Native American focused groups and lore on TRP, transitioning to actually trying to write fiction- this is surprisingly difficult if you are looking to take it seriously and flesh it out.

  1. The indigenous revival of the 90s also coincides with the emergence of the Internet, and a large period where New Age types tokenized Native culture in ways that still affects our popular culture. Depending on the scope of research your group, you're often spending a lot of time not only finding information actually relevant but also having to discard pages and pages of uninformed crap written by Burning Man visitors, /r/historymemes, someone who saw Last of the Mohicans once, and Mormon bushcrafters in Papyrus font to find information that you can use.
  2. Many players I've encountered aren't American and many have never actually met someone who identifies as native, Metis, etc. This then means that when making your group, you are also finding players who will take the premise seriously and not create caricatures of native peoples. This is also to say nothing about innately understanding that people of a certain culture don't always behave the same way like Star Trek characters. From my own perspective, I'm a Japanese person and I can count on one hand the number of people who played Japanese-Americans in a believable way. I could see how frustrating this might get to someone running a group or a RL player of native descent.
  3. There is currently a bit of a visible minority-driven zeitgeist right now in all media, with indigenous stories written by indigenous people. As a result, it feels the quality expectations are much higher for representation in fiction, as there is definitely a visible "colonizer" sense when I watch or read older stuff. I know I've become much more interested in writing what I know as a Japanese person, and leaving alone things which are totally out of my depth.
In the end, there's just a lot of obstacles which makes it kind of an impractical venture for something at the "seriousness" level of GMod. I myself have actually stepped away from most of my indigenous lore until I can have it reviewed by someone who knows more (and not many people will do it outside of the professional sphere on account of people asking these questions all the time), and who knows? I may never pick it up again.

However, inclusion and representation is important in all forms of media including something like Gmod Roleplay. If you (or the community as a whole) are going to have this, it's probably important to educate yourself specifically on modern indigenous issues in North America, the people that live in the region you'd like to set it, how that incorporates into your lore, and if possible have involvement of someone who does know more about it.

Should Non-Native Authors Write about Native Americans? - Novel Factory This article here is a very well rounded take by a FCT Choctaw novelist which I think answers it better than any way I could.
Yeah that's the main problems I've had with doing things like this in the past. TnBers seem to have a problem with not culturally appropriating lol.

Anyway, if I was going to make a Native American faction, I'd most definitely be doing it right. I myself have a Makah Grandfather, so I'm pretty well versed when it comes to Pacific Northwestern Native American cultures, like the Makah, Duwamish and Suquamish.

Since the town is more towards the East coast though, it'd probably be realistic that we'd see a tribe like the Cherokee or Shawnee in server, if we were to see anything at all.

I would just like to let you know that I am personally pretty well versed, but if I was actually going to do something on server, I'd need to do a bit more research about the specific tribes and cultures in that area. I do get the concern though, there's a lot of Q-anon types and Burning Man visitors that see themselves like Native Americans when they're just rich white people spending a lot of money on trying to be poor.
 
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